Brian was recently featured in a crowd-sourced article on CIO.com about “Enterprise Use Cases Abound for Virtual Reality Solutions“.

…and when it comes to sales, business team, and customer meetings, VR solutions “reduce costs of sending people off site with the overhead of travel expenses,” says Brian E. Thomas (@DivergentCIO), CTO of Coruzant Technologies.

Full article can be found HERE.

Brian was recently featured in a crowd-sourced article on CIO.com about “Assessing the Value of Corporate Data“.

That said, “value” can be a vague concept, with meanings and measurements that vary considerably among different organizations. Chief Technology Officer Brian E. Thomas (@DivergentCIO), asks, for example, “Is the data valuable because it needs to be secured (via regulations such as HIPAA and PCI), or is it the highly rich consumer data that companies are striving to make business shifts based on purchasing trends?”

“Before you can determine value,” he adds, “you need to have structured and mature data governance and data analytics programs. That way there is a collaborative process for classifying and using that data based on its criteria.”

#BigData #DivergentCIO #DataValue #Data #ConsumerData #CTO #CIO

 

CIO.com official logo from IDGBrian was recently featured in a crowd-sourced article on CIO.com about “AI’s Healthcare Promise Will Serve Patients – And More“.

“From early disease detection, improved patient safety, reduced or eliminated repeatable/mundane tasks and human errors, and more accurate medical billing, AI will play an expanding role in healthcare”, says Brian E. Thomas, Healthcare CIO. “Simply put, implementing a set of processes that combines both machines and humans will reap the most benefits.”

#ArtificialIntelligence #DivergentCIO #NLP #DeepLearning #Healthcare #CIO

 

 
 
 
 
 

Official BMC Helix logo as part of CIO.comBrian was recently featured in a crowd-sourced article on BMC Felix about “A Single Point of Control: How IT Leaders are Advocating for Automation Platforms“.

“Accelerated detection and remediation are the results of incorporating emerging technologies into the automated platform”, says Brian Thomas (@DivergentCIO), CTO of Coruzant Technologies.

“Cybersecurity products have been and are increasingly incorporating more AI technology into their platforms and appliances, due to the sheer number of daily attacks on company networks,” he says. “Utilizing AI technology, these tools not only can learn over time, but they have the ability to immediately detect, alert, and disable threats on the spot — even if it is something that it is not familiar with or has ever seen.”

#AI #Machines #DeepLearning #CyberSecurity #CTO

 

 
 
 

CIO.com official logo from IDGBrian was recently featured in a crowd-sourced article on CIO.com about “Navigating a Data-Driven Culture“.

“CIOs that have demonstrated strong leadership and who can draw from robust interpersonal skills to build and nurture relationships will be instrumental in influencing and orchestrating such cultural change”, says Brian E. Thomas (@DivergentCIO), CIO. “To drive the culture shift, CIOs need to play a significant role in bridging the gaps in technology fluency with business objectives.”

#Culture #Leadership #Data #DataDriven #CIO

 

 
 
 

Brian was featured in a crowd-sourced whitepaper on Harvard Business Review about “The Power of Predictive IT“.

As soon as you can employ automated tools to do work humans were doing, there’s a huge increase in the time the resources get back to work on strategies to strengthen your operations environment”, says Brian Thomas (@DivergentCIO), CTO of Coruzant Technologies.

 

Kansas City IT Symposium logoBrian Thomas participated and spoke as a panelist on the session with key note speaker, Peter High on “The Path to CIO – How to Go From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be” at the Kansas City IT Symposium in 2017. Brian shared his real-world experience on growing his career by building his brand through social media, speaking events, mentoring junior leaders, and volunteering for boards.

 
 

The CEO of a company has historically been the driving force in overall strategy and vision. Same goes for all types of leadership, from CIOs to CFOs…all play an important role in advancing a company forward. The key here is “forward.” While the person in this position is important for a particular point in time, this role is static — a snapshot, if you will, of an organization’s success or failure at a fixed point in time. What’s most important is enduring business performance that stems from leadership culture as well as deliberate, well-thought-out development of leadership at every level.

The CEO Strategy

No one’s doubting the CEO’s role. However, research shows that the level of a particular company’s maturity in their leadership development has a far greater influence on their long-term performance than anything else, including individuals who fill the role of CEO, CFO or even CIO. So how do strong companies with an eye on the future choose CIOs, not just for their individual skill sets, but who will advance the company culture of success to endure in the future long after they’re gone?

  • They link leadership strategy to business strategy.
  • They make sure their leaders are aligned, coached, and trained in the company vision.
  • They build leadership development programs and select professionals based on their ability to drive the company’s strategy.
  • They incorporate leadership qualities into the corporate culture at all levels: managers, supervisors, etc.
  • They develop leaders from the bottom up.
  • They invest a lot of money in leadership development through training, seminars and workshops.
  • They create their own unique leadership model based on research, rather than hire a consultant or adopt an existing model.

Leadership that endures is built right into the very core of a company. That way, when a CEO leaves and a new one takes over, the strategy is already lined up, waiting for continued implementation. Of course, every leader brings his or her own unique spins to the strategy, but the bones should be solid and built to last the test of time. CEOs are there to adopt the leadership culture, make changes as needed, and weed out areas of complacency. Their job is to be the catalyst behind a culture of working as one to perpetuate the goals of the organization. That means fostering teamwork and holding people accountable no matter which level they happen to be at.


Leadership and Technology

Technology is one important sub-set of a company’s success. Without proper management across the board and over time, it can be difficult to drive effective change that lasts. When it comes specifically to CIO leadership as it pertains to technology to drive a company forward, the same principle applies. Strategies that ensure enduring long-term performance despite who’s sitting in the CIO seat include:

  • Clear definitions of requirements
  • Consultation with all team members on goals
  • Creation of specific and measurable goals
  • Regular tracking of progress

CIO recommends using the SMART acronym when setting goals for the long term designed to transcend individual leaders:

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Realistic
  • Time bound

Creating a Culture of Endurance

In short, the success or failure of a company has more to do with strategy and vision for its long-term success than the individual. Clearly, there are innovative CEOs that propel a company to greatness, and then there are some very bad CEOs that damage that vision and set back the corporate culture; some companies bounce back from that and some don’t. The key is to establish a leadership strategy that can stay the course throughout the decades and that can weather any storm that may blow in.

 

Richtopia Top 100 CIORichtopia has named Brian Thomas to the list of the Top 100 Most Influential Information Technology Officers in the World.  He placed #43 on the list.  You can read the full article here.

 
 
 
 

CIOs have an inherent duty to demonstrate the value of their departments, and this is never more true than with IT. It’s the same across other platforms of a business, from sales to finance to operations. With technology becoming more and more commoditized, companies are measuring the value of their IT departments, and thus services, in regards to the preservation of business value, creating benchmarks as a result of those outcomes, points out CIO. NO matter what department you’re talking about, the same principles of revenue generation and top-notch operations are used to not only evaluate but also prioritize and measure various projects to boost shareholder value.


The IT department in any given company is an important cog in the output machine. Take a mobile sales platform for a healthcare EMR system, for example. If something fails at the IT level, the whole system gets hung up, resulting in the possibility of a patient not gaining access to the medication they need to be healthy. It’s too easy to imagine a bunch of IT pros sitting in a back room somewhere far removed from the daily operations of a business. Not so. They have just as much impact on the organization’s failure or success as anyone else.

Flexibility

Being flexible in an ever-demanding and complex environment is an important facet of an IT department, one that can make or break the operational capacity of an organization. As such, IT is required to provide more service and solutions above and beyond just “keeping the lights on.” In fact, IT and its partnership with business balance both past and present collaborations to determine future successes. Because IT is most useful when projects are delivered successfully to the end consumer, its value is dependent on persuading management to measure positive value-added contributions as well as maintain a steady presence — even despite such a complex environment.

Business Capability

Much more than a technological-minded organism, IT offers a great value to the business capabilities of a given company, not just in the area of technology capability and contributions. IT as a cohesive unit can provide valuable input on business decisions, leading to solutions that benefit the company as a whole. So what can the CIO and IT do together to demonstrate effectiveness to the rest of the organization?

Business operates on a principle of “what’s in it for me?” — after all, this is how competition thrives. Therefore, IT needs to:

  • Realize what their pain points are
  • Identify areas of improvement, specifically in relation to IT
  • Provide a strategic advantage from a productivity perspective
  • Work on developing a partnership mentality
  • Demonstrate value instance by instance, with clear objectives

As the business strategist, the CIO needs to ensure IT’s strategic value is visible to the rest of the organization. Their position of leadership enables them to execute IT strategy, goals and objectives, and ensure they are aligned with the culture of the company as a whole. Driving business process improvements, IT becomes just as important a link in the chain as every other department when it comes to solutions that align with the corporate vision.