Generation Z is certainly shaping the change in education, not just in in regards to a greater dependence on technology but also in the way they embrace social learning environments, becoming hands-on and directly involved in the learning process. According to Forbes, they expect on-demand services that are available at any time, with low barriers to access, and are more career-focused earlier on in their college careers than their earlier counterparts. But before we get into the specifics, let’s take a few moments to define what Generation Z is. Generation Z, or Gen Z for short, is the generation that comes after Millennials. They were born between 1997 and 2012 and range in age from seven to 22. Check out this cool Pew Research chart that explains all the generations, starting with the Silent Generation from 1928 to 1945.

What’s unique for Generation Z is that they were born into a generation where technology has always been around for them. Indeed, they were never not exposed to technology, which has been a part of their lives from the very beginning. The iPhone launched in 2007, a time when the oldest Gen Zers were just 10 years old. By the time they hit their teens, these young Americans were primarily connecting with the web through mobile devices, WiFi and high-bandwidth cellular service. While Millennials saw the emergence of social media, constant connectivity and on-demand entertainment, these innovations evolved over time, which Millennials adapted to as they came of age. Those born after 1996 were ushered into this age as a matter of course.

Growing up in an “always on” technological environment has led to significant changes in youth behaviors, lifestyles and attitudes.

The Learning Process

There’s been a dramatic shift in the way in which Generation Z learns. Studies show that today’s students don’t have any interest in being passive learners. They don’t want to sit behind a desk, spew facts back at the teacher, memorize rote definitions for a test, and otherwise take a back seat to their educational journey. Rather, they want — demand, really — to be fully engaged in the learning process and become a unique part of it. In fact, these students thrive best when given the opportunity to have a fully immersive educational experience, with one study showing that 51 percent of students say they learn best by doing, whereas just 12 percent say they learn through listening. That majority also says they enjoy class discussions and interactive classroom environments rather than traditional teaching methods.

They have a preference towards engaging in a collaborative learning environment, to be sure, but it’s not limited to just in-person interactions. Gen Z is entirely comfortable learning alongside other students outside of the brick and mortar school building as they utilize digital tools such as Zoom, Skype and online forums to participate, connect and engage. This has never been truer than during the current pandemic, where everyone was thrust into a new online world of interactions.

But guess who was already there waiting to embrace the challenge and jump right in? That’s right, Gen Zers. They were well-positioned to thrive in a completely virtual environment because essentially they’ve been training for this day since they were born. Whereas Boomers and Gen Xers may have struggled with the new online reality, Gen Zers took it all in stride.

Because they are a digital generation, these students expect digital learning tools to be deeply integrated into their education. For them, technology is and always has been a fully integrated experience that pervades every aspect of their lives: why should education be any different? To that end, they wish to seamlessly connect their academic experiences to personal experiences via these same tools.

A Hyper-Connected World

According to Pew Research, just 14 percent of U.S. adults had access to the Internet in 1995, says Inc. By 2014, that number jumped to 87 percent. Generation Z came of age in the most accelerated and game-changing period of technological advancements in all of human history. But it goes beyond just the technology. It extends to a way of life, a constant connection to networks of people and information that almost acts of an extension of themselves.

Indeed, Generation Z are doers, contributors, and hackers of life and work. They gained a voice with mobile technology and on-demand connectivity that enabled them to streamline and systemize tasks and simplify complex problems because, well, there truly has always been “an app for that.”

From TikTok to YouTube, kids and teens today are self-motivators, driven by a passion to make a mark in this world. Going back to the title: where does Generation Z learn about technology? The answer is: everywhere. It’s a pervasive way of thinking that doesn’t elude them, is always in the background and is always on. From school to social media, technology forms the backbone of interaction.

Generation Z is now leading the change in how learning takes place, acting as a driving force in the innovation of new learning tools, unlimited access to resources, and teaching styles. In the end, they find themselves headed in the direction of a more learner-centric and technology-fueled environment where they can choose their own path and become the directors of their own futures.

Digital transformation in the business world refers to the efforts of companies to keep up with changing environments spurred on by customer demand and technology. Because digital tools and technology are constantly evolving and affecting how people interact with one another, this in turn changes the way in which we conduct business. How you transform your core business processes using digital technology will determine how you can achieve competitive advantage and gain differentiation in your market segment, says Techopedia. It’s essentially the third component of how businesses embrace digital technology, following digital competence and digital usage. With an ability to bring on new elements of innovation and creativity, digital transformation goes beyond enhancing and supporting traditional strategies.

What Spurs Change?

On the quest to find true digital transformation, one must understand the drivers that affect this change, namely profitability, customer satisfaction, and increased speed-to-market. There’s a general understand that CIOs should be the driving forces implementing this transformation for their businesses, but is this really happening? In reality, it doesn’t seem to be that cut and dried. In fact, digital transformation has many motivations and is the responsibility of many people, from top executives to lower-level employees, says CMS Wire.

According to research presented by MediaPost, poor customer experiences caused an estimated $83 billion loss by U.S. companies every year due to defections and abandoned shopping carts. With so many options these days offered by cloud, mobile, Internet of Things, and others, it’s easy to lose sight of quality of the data in favor or hyper personalization.

So the question remains: how can companies find true digital transformation with leadership from their CIOs?

Insights

Companies that can harness the power of true digital transformation will enjoy the fruits of their labor by being at the top of the heap in terms of competitive advantage and differentiation. That’s what we’re all striving for anyway, right? Here are some suggestions:

Have a real strategy ready to go. If you’re still grappling with how to come up with an operational plan that works for your website and social media platforms, you’re not going to get very far. Approach this goal not operationally but strategically, focusing on how your organization will be impacted by digital or how you can channel those new capabilities to broaden your overall business strategy. Lisa Welchman as quoted on CMS Wire says companies that have been disrupted by digital have become that way —  not because they didn’t have a CIO in charge of the transformation — but because they lost that 360-degree view of how digital would impact their digital models.

Recognize the full value of all digital assets throughout your company. CIOs all too often get into a file-centric mindset that puts them in a rut they can’t quite get out of. Instead, use flexible data models that will work to engage new streams of revenue in order to encourage innovation. This will go a long way towards creating important digital transformations such as attracting new clients or driving new sources of revenue.

Focus on the customer as central to your success in the digital age. As the CIO, you have to re-examine your thinking and accelerate your reach via the enhancement of the customer experience. Crafting a solid foundation on which to illustrate this transformation is key for longevity of purpose. As such, you must re-evaluate traditional roles and make sure you are incorporating the best talent and infrastructure to build a platform for your new targeted strategies.

Imaginative thinking, coupled with just the right amount of spot-on execution, will be the catalyst for true digital transformation.